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Design by Andrew Persoff.

PARKITECTURE

FEBRUARY A three-day retreat in Berlin informs artists of park histories, presences, and initiate discussions about futures.

JANUARY An international jury together with the Production Team meets to review and select proposals.

2012

DECEMBER 15 Call for Visions submission deadline.

SEPTEMBER Call for Visions invites creatives across media and disciplines to propose projects that activate this landscape.

JULY Musement returns to Berlin for two weeks to secure the park, pursue partners and sponsors, meet artists, and  plot the final journey towards the exhibition.

2011

AUGUST With a special-invitation international research grant from Art Matters NY, the artists return to Berlin, collectively called Musement, with an expanded group to investigate the park and its possibilities as a creative site. For two weeks, this group explores the park from social, political, economic, ecological, and visual vantages. Musement befriends EMGE, the park head security guard, who gives the group a private tour of the park and then takes them to other sites around Berlin that he tends. They meet with artists, curators, and Berliners who had experiences in the park during its operation, as well as people who have utilized its afterlife in works--films, installations, performances, music. Hosting the Spreepark Sneak, Musement brings 45 people to Treptower for conversation on the park and a group adventure over the fence. Their process and experience have been documented in a blog (http://kulturpark.tumblr.com/). Planning new tributaries that encapsulate divergent times, spaces, and places, Musement follows the tracks, leaving traces and connections in their wake.

JULY Artist Hans Schabus purchases a stegosaurs and a mammoth from the park and places them in the courtyard of Oranienplatz 17 in a work entitled “Klub Europa,” for the 6th Berlin Biennial. Bar25, a famed Berlin club, makes moves to purchase the park, and in July, Minimoo, a corporate techno promoter from the US, rents the park for a weekend dance party.”

2010

A group of engineers re-activate the ferris wheel and it turns again lit-up on the eve of the re-unification. Achterbahn, a documentary by Peter Dörfler, tells this story of the park’s bankruptcy focusing on Mr. Witte’s cocaine deals and the arrest of his son by Peruvian officials in a smuggling saga.

2009

CHRISTMAS DAY A little bird tells three artists visiting Berlin about an abandoned amusement park, and the next day they are hopping the fence. They encounter a magical world of nature and machines—trees breaking through roller coaster platforms, weathered operating booths, and a ferris wheel spinning slightly with the wind. Discovered and kindly ejected from the premises, they return home with video and photographs of this realm, dreaming of returning that park one day.

2007

2001

1991

1989

1969

Spreepark goes bankrupt due to economic downturn, increased admission costs, and unavailability of parking. The park remains insoluable and Mr. Witte remains in debt to investors.

Spreepark re-opens to the public with new rides including, a pirate ship, themed Western World area, renovated Ferris Wheel, and plaster dinosaurs, many purchased from Mirapolis, a recently closed amusement park in Paris. At its height, the park received 1.5 million visitors per year.

Kulturpark bought by Spreepark GmbH, under new private owner Norbert Witte. The park is simultaneously declared a nature sanctuary.

Kulturpark Plänterwald opens in Treptower Park, East Berlin. The GDR kulturpark was the only of its kind in East Germany, and a traditional stop for school children visiting Berlin from other Eastern Bloc countries.

Denotes Kulturpark history

TIMELINE

PUBLIC PROGRAM:

FILMS ABOUT THE PARK

Kulturpark — Documentary, 2004, 82 Minutes, Directed by Immanuel Weinland

Achterbahn — Documentary, 2009, 89 Minutes, Directed by Peter Dörfler

14  HUTBAHN CHAPEAU CLAQUE (AKA SNEAKY)VIEW ON MAP

Like many other rides, the Hutbahn “Chapeau Claque” was purchased in the early 90s from the bankrupt French amusement park, Mirapolis. The ride was dubbed “Sneaky” by Musement in 2010.

13  SPREEBLITZ ROLLER COASTERVIEW ON MAP

From 1987 to 1991, the “SpreeBlitz” family rollercoaster lived under the name “Le Dragon of Sortilèges” in the bankrupt French amusement park, Mirapolis. In 1992, Spreepark GmbH bought the roller coaster, along with many other rides from the bankrupt estate, and began to build immediately.

27  TEA CUPSVIEW ON MAP

In 1992, at the entrance to the amusement park, the “Roting Cup” carousel was built under the dome of a pavilion. A real visitor magnet, the ride was in operation until Spreepark’s closure 9 years later. Like many other rides, the giant “Roting Cup” ride was purchased from the bankrupt French amusement park, Mirapolis, in the early 90s.

26  HOPS AND HOPSI (THE CLOWN STAGE) VIEW ON MAP

Hidden in the Plänterwald Forest, the children’s stage was also a disco stage during certain Kulturpark night hours, under the GDR. From 1992 to 2001, the clowns Hops and Hopsi performed up to 3 times a day on this small outdoor stage. Their artistic, musical Kinderclownerie, didn’t only fill children with laughter. With the help of make-up, the kids were even able to join in and be transformed by the show.

12  MONTE CARLO DRIVE VIEW ON MAP

The entrance to the ticket booth was simply part of the long, sandy road of Plänterwald that lead to Spreepark. It was paved with stones in the winter of 1999/2000. From 1992-1995, resident dinosaurs of Spreepark were stationed at the entrance immediately past the Ticket Booth. Often greeted by costumed performers, the park would take pictures of its visitors when entering, with prints purchasable upon exiting.

11  GRAND CANYONVIEW ON MAP

In 1995, after years of construction, Spreepark’s new large flume called “Grand Canyon” was finally opened.

25  KENTUKY RIDEVIEW ON MAP

After the privatization of Spreepark, “Colorado City,” an electronic horse riding ride, was installed in Western World.

24  GHOST TRAIN (ALSO CALLED SPOOKY)VIEW ON MAP

In 1997, there were plans to build an expensive 10 million DM Haunting Ride. The construction of the rails was started in 1993, but the facade was never started due to financial reasons. The ride was most likely meant to be enclosed. The track is a continuous system: it is a gondola after another, like a Patanosta. Some pods were cut off by thieves, because the connector between the nacelles and the rail is valuable. Following the technical inspection in 1993, the railway was never put into operation. The ride was called “Spooky” by Musement in 2010.

10  FUTURO HOUSE (DEFUNCT)VIEW ON MAP

“Futuro House” was a UFO-shaped dwelling made in 1968, designed by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen as a ski-cabin or holiday home for 8 dwellers. The design reflects the optimism of the sixties, when people faithfully believed in technology as a solution for all human problems. Constructed out of reinforced plastic, this furnished structure was made from new, light, and inexpensive material for the time, with plans of mass-production to affordably house every person around the world.

9  SPIDER (DEFUNCT)VIEW ON MAP

The “Spider” was located inside of an encirclement of trees, where the “Futuro House” once stood. Today, the carousel still spins in Peru. The “Spider” was one of the rides the Witte family took to Lima, Peru, after Spreepark closed down in 2001.

23  PICADELLY CIRCUSVIEW ON MAP

The circus tent was set up at the beginning of the Spreepark era. It was bought in 1991 from the bankrupt French theme park Mirapolis.

8  WILD RIVER (DEFUNCT)VIEW ON MAP

Since the opening of Spreepark to the end of the 2000 season, the “Wild River” log flume ran in the western part of Spreepark. The ride, “Flic Flac,” replaced it.

22  GHOST HOUSEVIEW ON MAP

Formed in 1998 around the circus tent, a new subject area emerged with houses in the old English style. In the half-timbered houses, one could find the following attractions: a ball bit for children under 10 years, a haunted house experienced on foot, and a mirror maze called “Speigallabyrinth.” Now, the haunted house is completely empty. All ghost puppets and props have been sold over the years.

21  LOVE BOAT (VIEW ON MAP

Remained Unfinished.

7  MEGA-LOOP VIEW ON MAP

Originally form the bankrupt french amusement park Mirapolis under the name Miralooping, the ride was purchased by Spreepark GmbH in 1992.

15  SWAN RIDE VIEW ON MAP

In 1993, construction of the “Swan Ride” first begun. Since 1994, visitors could relax during the ride and glide through the scenery with sounds of music and splashes of water beavers.

16  DINOWORLDVIEW ON MAP

As with many attractions of Spreepark, the dinosaurs were purchased in the early 90’s from the bankrupt French amusement park, Mirapolis, and from 1992 to 1995, they greeted Spreepark visitors were greeted at the main entrance. In 1996, the Dinos were relocated between the rails of the mini truck ride. The figures are an icon of the park for many Berliners. For the 6th Berlin Biennale, artist Hans Schabus purchased the Stegasourus and Wooly Mammoth, and placed them in the Oranienplatz courtyard, calling the work “Klub Europa.”

17  CANALE GRANDEVIEW ON MAP

The construction of the “Canal Grande” cruise started in 1993. Since 1994, visitors could obtain a quiet boat ride on the “Canale Grande” to get an overview of Spreepark. The Canal tour takes you around the island of pirates, in front of the Amphitheater, and the Ferris wheel.

6  BUTTERFLYVIEW ON MAP

The Butterfly Carousel is loaded with years of history because of its long-term functioning. Already active in the park’s latter years under the GDR, as Kulturpark, the carousel lasted another decade in Spreepark, and then traveled to Peru, where the butterflies are said to now fly over visitors’ heads.

20  FERRIS WHEELVIEW ON MAP

The 40-meter-high Ferris wheel has always been an iconic attraction of the forested theme park. Originally, the big wheel hosted 36 carts, meaning a total of 216 people could enjoy the view into West Berlin. In 1989, for the 40th anniversary of the GDR, a newly built Ferris Wheel stood 45 meters high, and is visible today in Spreepark and surrounding Plänterwald area. After 8 years and 3 days of dormancy, the big wheel turned again on 07/11/2009 for the anniversary of reunification.

19  PIRATE SHIPVIEW ON MAP

Known Performances in the Amphitheater:
1994:
Monti-Show - tightrope
1995, 1996, 1997:
Stunt Show, “The Treasure of the Bounty” (stunt crew Babelsberg)
1998:
Dangler’s sea lion show
2001:
Stunt Show, “The Treasure of the Bounty” (stunt crew Berlin)

18  AMPHITHEATER VIEW ON MAP

In 1993, the large asphalt area around the giant Ferris wheel was filled with water, becoming a pool for small boats. After excavating the foundations of other rides, an 11-meter high mountain was erected at the foot of the Ferris Wheel, completed in 1994 as the Amphitheater.

5  CINEMA 2000VIEW ON MAP

During “Cinema 2000’s” operative days, the audience stood in the middle of a large dome tent, and were able to view a variety of movies. “Cinema 2000” was not a 3D movie theater, but a 360-degree cinema. The historic theater projector has been completely destroyed by vandals.

4  VIEW ON MAP

Since 1998, the Rollover Jill stood at the entrance of the Western Village. It is named after a daughter of Norbert Witte, who was then little Jill. In the ride, visitors sit in a boat that is constantly turning all of its axles. Sold after the park’s closing, the ride still rolls and is now said to be traveling through Asia.

FACTS ABOUT THE PARK

Spreepark is 29.5 ha, or 290 sq. m

Opened in 1969, the park is now enclosed by a 2.5m high fence

Spreepark attracted about 1.5 million people each year

During the 70’s and 80’s, the admission fee for “Kulturpark” was around 1DM : the park became a social and cultural meeting point of East Berliners and East Germans. With cheap entrance into an island of select private exchange, the park enabled a small punk scene to form in the 80’s, under the GDR. Culture was directly aided by the government to blossom in this “Kulturpark.”

Shopping in the city: After a day of shopping at the capital, “Kulturpark” was a popular destination for many East Germans. Goods always arrived first to East Berlin before being distributed to the rest of the country.

Apparently, exotic fruits and bananas were a rarity in the DDR, sold only in shops and restaurants for people of privilege. The park’s special exotic fruits stands were the only public outlets where routinely, every weekend, overripe, exotic fruits became available from more exclusive venues.

After the site became known as “Spreepark,” admission rose to around 29 DM by the mid-90s.

Spreepark closed down and went bankrupt in 2001.

IMAGES:

Thank you to Christopher Flade for these park photos from the archive.

3  WESTERN VILLAGE - LAS VEGAS COUNTRYVIEW ON MAP

In 1993, Rolf Deichsel, GDR-Showman, built the Western Village for about 1.9 mil- lion euros. The Western Village is beside a saloon, pony horse rides, some restaurants, amusement aracdes, and a bank. In the stunt show, “Money and Gold,” the bank is robbed twice a day.

2  SANTA FE EXPRESSVIEW ON MAP

In 1992, Spreepark laid the rails for the train ride, “Santa Fe Express.” The railroad was purchased from the bankrupt French amuse- ment park, “Mirapolis.” The “Santa Fe Ex- press” had three stations: the main station in the “Western Village” (“Station Colorado City”, later “Station Las Vegas Country”), the train station next to the “SpreeBlitz” (“Station SpreeBlitz”), and the last station on the circus tent (“Piccadilly Circus”).

1  TICKET BOOTH VIEW ON MAP

The entrance to the ticket booth was simply part of the long, sandy road of Plänterwald that lead to Spreepark. It was paved with stones in the winter of 1999/2000. From 1992-1995, resident dinosaurs of Spreepark were stationed at the entrance immediately past the Ticket Booth. Often greeted by costumed performers, the park would take pictures of its visitors when entering, with prints purchasable upon exiting.

PRODUCERS

CURATORIAL TEAM 

GEORGE SCHEER

George Scheer’s theoretical and artistic projects explore creative communities as political constituencies. He is a co-founder and Collaborative Director of Elsewhere, a living museum, international residency program, and educational laboratoy set within a former thrift store. George is currently pursuing a PhD in Communication/Performance Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill, and holds an MA in Critical Theory and Visual Culture from Duke University and a BA from the University of Pennsylvania in Political Communications. His current research explores the aesthetic context for social change and political practice.

STEPHANIE SHERMAN

Stephanie Sherman curates site-specific projects that transform places charged with layered histories into participatory environments for social play, collective imagination, public narratives, and collaborative production. She is a co-founder and Executive Director of Elsewhere, a living museum, international residency program, and educational laboratory set within a three-story former thrift store. As a public, interactive archive of cultural surplus, Elsewhere investigates how 20th Century things pattern social, psychological and materio-philosophical life to inform collaborative, 21st Century futures. She has produced interactive projects for PAFA (Philadelphia, PA), The Headlands Center for the Arts (Sausolito, CA), and NC Art Museum (Raleigh, NC), lectured throughout the country, and written curatorial texts for a variety of exhibitions and publications. She holds an MA in Critical Theory from Duke and a BA from UPenn in English Literature. She is based Elsewhere (elsewhereelsewhere.org) in Greensboro, North Carolina.

ANTHONY SPINELLO

Anthony Spinello is the creator of Spinello Projects (spinelloprojects.com), a nomadic playground for unorthodox and experimental artists who don’t easily fit into the confines of the traditional gallery space. Interested in the many aspects of art facilitation in a complex market, Spinello tackles the concept of Art Fairs with his annually produced fair, Littlest Sister, the smallest art fair in the world. Enamored with “behind the scenes” experiences, Spinello becomes a medium, researcher, story teller and collaborator. He is the Editor-At-Large of Dirty Magazine (dirty-mag.com), a new creative quarterly and curatorial endeavor, showcasing the work of a new generation of artists & designers. A NY native and School of Visual Arts alumnus, he currently lives and works between Miami, FL, New York, NY and Berlin, Germany.

AGUSTINA WOODGATE

Agustina Woodgate works inclusively and socially, finding new access points for communication to create public, intensive, and process-oriented works. Her practice responds to particular places or situations, exploring the physical, emotional and cultural relationships we have with our surroundings and seeking solutions for living.  She has exhibited and performed her work internationally and has been featured in various publications including The Guardian, TIME Magazine, Art Papers, Art Nexus, The Miami New Times, and The Miami Herald amongst others. Originally from Argentina, she earned her BFA from the National University of Visual Arts in Buenos Aires. She can be found at Spinello Projects and agustinawoodgate.com.


PRODUCTION TEAM 

ANDREW PERSOFF

CHRIS LINEBERRY

DANIEL FISHKIN

DAVID BUTTON

DIETA SIXT

JULIET HINELY

NATALIA ZULUAGA 

PARIS FURST

SIMON WIND

CULTURAL PARTNERS 

BETA HAUSbetahaus.de

ELSEWHERE COLLABORATIVEgoelsewhere.org

ERASMUS MUNDIemjdconferences.wordpress.com

INDEPENDENT CURATORS INTERNATIONALcuratorsintl.org

LEGALART MIAMIlegalartmiami.org

PROVISIONS RESEARCH CENTERAT GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITYprovisionslibrary.com

PUBLICARTWIKIpublicartwiki.org

SKULPTURENPARK BERLIN_ZENTRUMskulpturenpark.org

SPINELLO PROJECTSspinelloprojects.com 

EDUCATIONAL PARTNERS 

URBAN ARTS INSTITUTE ATMASSACHUSETTS COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGNmassart.edu

MEDIA PARTNERS  

DIRTY MAGAZINEdirty-mag.com

ARTSTARS*artstarstv.com

WOOLOOwooloo.org 

FUNDING PARTNERS 

ART MATTERS NYartmattersfoundation.org

JAMES ALEFANTIScometpingpong.com

MIKESELL FAMILYfountainheadresidency.com 

NEIGHBORHOOD PARTNERS 

EMGE SECURITYemge-sicherheit.de

PARTNERS

ARTINFO"Meet the Itinerant Art Crew Transforming an Abandoned Berlin Amusement Park Into an Artist Wonderland," 2011.
"Support Kulturpark’s Artistic Reimagining of an Abandoned Berlin Amusement Park," 2012.

ARTLURKER________"Artists Activate Abandoned Amusement | Spreepark, Berlin," 2010.

DESIGNBOOM________"kulturpark: public art reclamation of abandoned theme park," 2012.

DIRTY MAGAZINE________"On the Air with Argentine Darling Agustina Woodgate," 2011.
"Kulturpark Public Art Project Announces Kickstarter Initiative," 2012.

GOOD ________"Kulturpark: An Abandoned Amusement Park Becomes a Public Art Space," 2012.

HUFFINGTON POST________"Artists Take Back Abandoned Amusement Park in Berlin," 2011.

INHABITAT________"Kulturpark: Abandoned Amusement Park in Berlin Will Become a Magical Art Installation This Summer," 2012.

MIAMI NEW TIMES________"Miami Artists' Kulturpark Project Revives a Forgotten European Wonderland," 2012.

MODERN LUXURY________"Arts & Power 2011," 2011.

NEW YORK TIMES________"Coming Attractions," 2011.

REFINERY 29________"This Amazing Abandoned Amusement Park Might Become An Artist's Disneyworld," 2012.

VENTUREVILLAGE________"The 5 Best Berlin Kickstarter Campaigns," 2012.

PRESS

ABOUT KULTURPARK

STORY

In the Treptower Park forest in East Berlin, along the Spreeriver, there is an abandoned amusement park. The park, originally called Kulturpark Planterwald, was built in 1969 by the GDR and was a rare site for Soviet amusement and attraction. After the fall of the wall, the park became the family-owned Spreepark and suffered challenges of access, attendance, and economy. In 2001, the park closed from capital collapse. Ever since, visitors have regularly traversed the fence to explore this jungle of broken thrill machines.

 

KULTURPARK

In June 2012, Kulturpark will explore the poetics and potential of these recent ruins, building upon the unique energy of Berlin’s urban, social, cultural, and political landscapes.

Kulturpark will:
- Investigate these lands as a site for cultural imagination.
- Connect communities to explore possibilities for shared stories, memories, and ideas.
- Instigate physical, social, and collaborative movement.
- Model responsible forms for creative life and ecology for the 21st Century.
- Propose possibilities for the park as an evolving constellation of our shared past, presence, and future.

 

THE PROJECT INCLUDES

CREATIVE CAMP | June 1 - 21
The three-week creative camp will unite Berlin-born and based visionaries in the production of collaborative site-specific works through a residency camp and outdoor park studio in the park.

KULTUR-EXCHANGE | June 22 - July 1
The ten-day kultur-exchange program will host students and groups from the US and Germany for discussions, workshops, projects, and research exploring the park and its contexts.

PUBLIC TOURS | June 30 - July 1
Kulturpark invites local/international audiences for an interactive exploration of the park. Bring your camera!

Full information above.

 

WHY AMUSEMENT PARKS

Amusement parks have always modeled new futures for society.

They unfold popular interest and global imaginations.

They inspire our collective dreams, desires, fears, and fantasies.

They demonstrate the relativity of our experience and offer new perceptions of the world surrounding us.

Recent ruins are habitats where the secrets of future societies grow and evolve.

 

WHY BERLIN

Berlin is a city modeling cultural exchange, urban activism, open space, transportation, and re-use. In Berlin, culture is at the forefront of social concern, leading to innovation in social spaces, memory outlets, and public infrastructures that form a common ground to exchange, discover, learn, and remember. This template for sustainable living, conscious environment, democratic education, and creative society can be shared and visualized.

 

Berlin is developing rapidly, through commercial and capital interests.

This park’s ruins contain remainders and reminders of invention, leisure, and progress.

Its memories offer spaces for new imaginations and connections.

The collective interest in this place—its history and current state—allows us to re-think the potential for amusement and entertainment as a tool for progressing culture and civil society.

We are offering a purpose for the park other than commodity or capital use.

 

FOR WHO

Kuturpark will welcome civilians from the local district, Berlin citizens seeking leisure attractions, and global audiences invested in contemporary art and design.

International contemporary art audiences will visit the Treptow park and district, experiencing art and design as a tool for social action.

Global historians, urban planners, cultural producers, and amusement park fans will experience this park as online archive and special destination.

Educational activities will engage communities of architects, artists planners, designers, and university students in preserving Berlin’s histories and modeling inventive futures.

The dissemination of materials around this popular investigation will share Berlin’s unique approach to environmental productions, layered histories, and living memories with audiences worldwide.

 

POLITICS

Presence embodies pasts and futures.

What we see, sense, and know is out there. The world we share, the tools we use, and the relations we produce, embody a common plane from which we aggregate and illuminate these knowledges--popular, unconscious, multiplicitous.

At the overlap of governmentalities and local meanings we uncover residual spaces and compressed histories. We explore their qualities as patterns of collapsed times, existent archives, systematic decays, and material excesses. At those ruptures, we cultivate a secondary economy of placetime within which to labor for a common responsibility towards experience and sensation. Our work aims to repurpose sites and propose solutions upon their grounds, respecting them as already the work of a work of art and presencing moments of critical play within every apparatus.

We are instrumental materialists striving for a populist position, seeking to perpetuate a multiplicity of informed and re-purposed conditions. We are neither social democrats, marxists, nor pragmatists, however, such positions contain corporative elements—compromise, ideology , social education—that compose some of our strategic tools for conditioning a polyvocal and emergent commons.

ENCOUNTERS IN AN ABANDONED AMUSEMENT PARK

Hidden within Treptower Park, in the Planterwald Berlin forest, sits a former amusement park. Welcome to a jungle of recent ruins, a modern mystery, a public secret.

These are captivating and contentious lands — a forbidden zone, a patched fence, a forest preserve, and peripheral attractions. Caught in this intermittent and

indeterminate state, this park unfolds a contradictory landscape composed of abandoned memories, bureaucratic systems, and collective dreams. The park, its keepers, and its adventurers are entangled in the evolutions of this almost impossible space — whose iterations reveal cycles of passing and impending times.

In the ruins of collapsed and layered systems, surpluses and slippages emerge.

On June 30 and July 1, 2012, visionaries from Berlin and beyond explore the physical, relative, and invisible dynamics at play upon the park. Captivated, their interruptions reflect its past, presence, and future, and confront the contained, the assumed, the imagined, and the unseen.

From these limits, we discover a new open.

Kulturpark is about the movements of amusement — its inherent dangers, its inevitable risk, its attraction, its liberation, its destiny.

 

PROGRAM AND SCHEDULE

Kulturpark is pleased to support park operations by encouraging visitors this weekend and in the future to view these lands as a work of art formed by nature and time. Kulturpark recommends that visitors abide by all park regulations, keeping in mind that life is the new ride and getting lost is an adventure.

PARK TOURS 15 EUROS

TRAIN RIDE 2 EUROS

CAFÉ MYTHOS

KULTURPARK INFO CENTER AT THE GAZEBO (SEE MAP)

11:00 English
13:00 German
16:00 German

Every 1⁄2 hour

11:00 - 19:00

11:00 - 19:00

SATURDAY, JUNE 30 SUNDAY, JULY 1

 

DOWNLOAD PROGRAM

PDF, 1.5 MB

ENGLISHDEUTSCH

PUBLIC PROGRAM

Information
Program PDF, 1.5 MB

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